WisconsinAquaculture.com - More reason to eat farmed fish
FIND a WAA Fish Farmer FIND a FISH FARMER   My Shopping Cart MY Shopping Bag   Contact Us Contact
More reason to eat farmed fish

For the entire story

In a year-long investigation, the AP talked to more than 40 current and former slaves in Benjina. The AP documented the journey of a single large shipment of slave-caught seafood from the Indonesian village, tracking it by satellite to a gritty Thai harbor. Upon its arrival, AP journalists followed trucks that loaded and drove the seafood over four nights to dozens of factories, cold storage plants and the country's biggest fish market.

The tainted seafood mixes in with other fish at a number of sites in Thailand, including processing plants. U.S. Customs records show that several of those Thai factories ship to America. They also sell to Europe and Asia, but the AP traced shipments to the U.S., where trade records are public.

By this time, it is nearly impossible to tell where a specific fish caught by a slave ends up. However, entire supply chains are muddied, and money is trickling down the line to companies that benefit from slave labor.

 

  .: More Other Aquaculture Articles :.  
[ Return ] to previous page.
WisconsinAquaculture.com - More reason to eat farmed fish
WisconsinAquaculture.com - More reason to eat farmed fish
Shop NOW!
WisconsinAquaculture.com - More reason to eat farmed fish
•   Events & Seminars  • Literature and Posters  • Clothing  • DVD  • WAA Membership  • Advertising  •
WisconsinAquaculture.com - More reason to eat farmed fish
 
Accepted Here
We Accept Visa
Visa
We Accept MasterCard
MasterCard
We Accept Discover
Discover
 
^ Top Of Page ^
 

 


WisconsinAquaculture.com Powered By Adobe ColdFusion